Psychosocial outcomes of dyadic arts interventions for people with a dementia and their informal caregivers: A systematic review

Journal article


Bourne, Philippa, Camic, P. and Crutch, S. 2020. Psychosocial outcomes of dyadic arts interventions for people with a dementia and their informal caregivers: A systematic review. Health & Social Care in the Community. 29 (6), pp. 1632-1649. https://doi.org/10.1111/hsc.13267
AuthorsBourne, Philippa, Camic, P. and Crutch, S.
Abstract

Dementia is a neurodegenerative syndrome that can lead to profound psychological and social challenges for people with dementia and their informal caregivers. Previous research has found positive effects of arts-based interventions for people with dementia and caregivers that have been dyadic in nature and the present article sought to review these findings. A systematic literature review was conducted to investigate psychosocial outcomes of dyadic arts interventions. PsychINFO, Medline, Web of Science and ASSIA databases (from journal inception to March 2020) were searched as well as Google Scholar and reference lists of relevant studies. Interventions were delivered to people with dementia and their caregivers in community-based settings across five countries. Thirteen peer-reviewed journal articles met the criteria for inclusion in this review, six focusing on performing arts and seven on visual arts. The findings suggested that choral singing and visual arts interventions may have positive effects on psychosocial outcomes for both people with dementia and their informal caregivers. Improved wellbeing, quality of life, mood, enhanced identity and decreased social isolation were found in some studies. Importantly, across all studies, participants reported enjoying arts activities. This is the first review to systematically assess dyadic arts activities in a dementia context. These activities offer enjoyable and engaging experiences for many PWD and caregivers and were generally found to have positive results but mostly small sample size, lack of control groups and different outcome measures made comparisons challenging. Future research recommendations include further theoretical development, identifying key intervention components, and specifying relevant and measurable theoretically-informed outcomes within dyadic interventions for this population.

KeywordsPublic Health, Environmental and Occupational Health; Health Policy; Sociology and Political Science; Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
Year2020
JournalHealth & Social Care in the Community
Journal citation29 (6), pp. 1632-1649
PublisherWiley
ISSN0966-0410
1365-2524
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1111/hsc.13267
Official URLhttps://doi.org/10.1111/hsc.13267
FunderWellcome Trust
Publication dates
Print27 Dec 2020
Online27 Dec 2020
Publication process dates
Accepted19 Nov 2020
Deposited08 Feb 2021
Accepted author manuscript
Output statusPublished
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