Cognitive bias modification for paranoia (CBM-pa): a randomised controlled feasibility study in patients with distressing paranoid beliefs.

Journal article


Yiend, Jenny, Lam, C., Schmidt, Nora, Crane, Bryony, Heslin, Margaret, Kabir, Thomas, McGuire, Philip, Meek, Christopher, Mouchlianitis, Elias, Peters, Emmanuelle, Stahl, Daniel, Trotta, Antonella and Shergill, Sukhwinder 2022. Cognitive bias modification for paranoia (CBM-pa): a randomised controlled feasibility study in patients with distressing paranoid beliefs. Psychological Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291722001520
AuthorsYiend, Jenny, Lam, C., Schmidt, Nora, Crane, Bryony, Heslin, Margaret, Kabir, Thomas, McGuire, Philip, Meek, Christopher, Mouchlianitis, Elias, Peters, Emmanuelle, Stahl, Daniel, Trotta, Antonella and Shergill, Sukhwinder
AbstractCognitive Bias Modification for paranoia (CBM-pa) is a novel, theory-driven psychological intervention targeting the biased interpretation of emotional ambiguity associated with paranoia. Study objectives were (i) test the intervention's feasibility, (ii) provide effect size estimates, (iii) assess dose-response and (iv) select primary outcomes for future trials. In a double-blind randomised controlled trial, sixty-three outpatients with clinically significant paranoia were randomised to either CBM-pa or an active control (text reading) between April 2016 and September 2017. Patients received one 40 min session per week for 6 weeks. Assessments were given at baseline, after each interim session, post-treatment, and at 1- and 3-months post-treatment. A total of 122 patients were screened and 63 were randomised. The recruitment rate was 51.2%, with few dropouts (four out of 63) and follow-up rates were 90.5% (1-month) and 93.7% (3-months). Each session took 30-40 min to complete. There was no statistical evidence of harmful effects of the intervention. Preliminary data were consistent with efficacy of CBM-pa over text-reading control: patients randomised to the intervention, compared to control patients, reported reduced interpretation bias ( = -0.48 to -0.76), improved symptoms of paranoia ( = -0.19 to -0.38), and lower depressed and anxious mood ( = -0.03 to -0.29). The intervention effect was evident after the third session. CBM-pa is feasible for patients with paranoia. A fully powered randomised control trial is warranted.
KeywordsParanoia; RCT; Cognitive bias modification; Interpretation bias; Psychosis
Year2022
JournalPsychological Medicine
ISSN1469-8978
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291722001520
Official URLhttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/psychological-medicine/article/cognitive-bias-modification-for-paranoia-cbmpa-a-randomised-controlled-feasibility-study-in-patients-with-distressing-paranoid-beliefs/2563E17112B7984FC28CE26E4ACB2437
Publication dates
Online14 Jun 2022
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Deposited28 Jun 2022
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https://repository.canterbury.ac.uk/item/91594/cognitive-bias-modification-for-paranoia-cbm-pa-a-randomised-controlled-feasibility-study-in-patients-with-distressing-paranoid-beliefs

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