Direct eye gaze enhances the ventriloquism effect

Journal article


Lavan, N., Chan, Wing Yue, Zhuang, Yongping, Mareschal, Isabelle and Shergill, Sukhwinder S. 2022. Direct eye gaze enhances the ventriloquism effect. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13414-022-02468-5
AuthorsLavan, N., Chan, Wing Yue, Zhuang, Yongping, Mareschal, Isabelle and Shergill, Sukhwinder S.
AbstractThe "ventriloquism effect" describes an illusory phenomenon where the perceived location of an auditory stimulus is pulled toward the location of a visual stimulus. Ventriloquists use this phenomenon to create an illusion where an inanimate puppet is perceived to speak. Ventriloquists use the expression and suppression of their own and the puppet's mouth movements as well the direction of their respective eye gaze to maximize the illusion. While the puppet's often exaggerated mouth movements have been demonstrated to enhance the ventriloquism effect, the contribution of direct eye gaze remains unknown. In Experiment 1, participants viewed an image of a person's face while hearing a temporally synchronous recording of a voice originating from different locations on the azimuthal plane. The eyes of the facial stimuli were either looking directly at participants or were closed. Participants were more likely to misperceive the location of a range of voice locations as coming from a central position when the eye gaze of the facial stimuli were directed toward them. Thus, direct gaze enhances the ventriloquist effect by attracting participants' perception of the voice locations toward the location of the face. In an exploratory analysis, we furthermore found no evidence for an other-race effect between White vs Asian listeners. In Experiment 2, we replicated the effect of direct eye gaze on the ventriloquism effect, also showing that faces per se attract perceived sound locations compared with audio-only sound localization. Showing a modulation of the ventriloquism effect by socially-salient eye gaze information thus adds to previous findings reporting top-down influences on this effect. [Abstract copyright: © 2022. The Author(s).]
KeywordsEye gaze; Sound localization; Voice; Direct gaze; Ventriloquism effect
Year2022
JournalAttention, Perception & Psychophysics
ISSN1943-393X
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.3758/s13414-022-02468-5
Official URLhttps://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.3758/s13414-022-02468-5.pdf
FunderWellcome Trust
Publication dates
Online31 Mar 2022
Publication process dates
Accepted23 Feb 2022
Deposited20 Apr 2022
Publisher's version
License
Output statusPublished
Permalink -

https://repository.canterbury.ac.uk/item/90y91/direct-eye-gaze-enhances-the-ventriloquism-effect

Download files


Publisher's version
  • 18
    total views
  • 5
    total downloads
  • 3
    views this month
  • 1
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

The influence of trial-by-trial feedback on trust in health, first-episode and chronic psychosis
Lemmers-Jansen, I., Wichmann, Rune J., Perizonius, Sophie and Shergill, Sukhi S. 2022. The influence of trial-by-trial feedback on trust in health, first-episode and chronic psychosis. Games. 13 (5), p. e59. https://doi.org/10.3390/g13050059
Vortioxetine as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of schizophrenia
Redaelli, Sofia, Porffy, Lilla, Oloyede, Ebenezer, Dzahini, O., Lewis, Gabriella, Lobo, Maria, Whiskey, E. and Shergill, Sukhi S. 2022. Vortioxetine as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of schizophrenia. Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology. 12, p. 204512532211100. https://doi.org/10.1177/20451253221110014
Cognitive bias modification for paranoia (CBM-pa): a randomised controlled feasibility study in patients with distressing paranoid beliefs.
Yiend, Jenny, Lam, C., Schmidt, Nora, Crane, Bryony, Heslin, Margaret, Kabir, Thomas, McGuire, Philip, Meek, Christopher, Mouchlianitis, Elias, Peters, Emmanuelle, Stahl, Daniel, Trotta, Antonella and Shergill, Sukhwinder 2022. Cognitive bias modification for paranoia (CBM-pa): a randomised controlled feasibility study in patients with distressing paranoid beliefs. Psychological Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291722001520
The role of cognitive control in the positive symptoms of psychosis
Horne, Charlotte M., Sahni, Angad, Pang, Sze W., Vanes, Lucy D., Szentgyorgyi, Timea, Averbeck, Bruno, Moran, Rosalyn J. and Shergill, Sukhwinder S. 2022. The role of cognitive control in the positive symptoms of psychosis. NeuroImage. Clinical. 34, p. 103004. https://doi.org/S2213-1582(22)00069-9
New approaches to antipsychotic medication adherence – safety, tolerability and acceptability
Taub, Sharon, Krivoy, Amir, Whiskey, Eromona and Shergill, Sukhi S. 2021. New approaches to antipsychotic medication adherence – safety, tolerability and acceptability. Expert Opinion on Drug Safety. 21 (4), pp. 517-524. https://doi.org/10.1080/14740338.2021.1983540
A systematic review of TMS and neurophysiological biometrics in patients with schizophrenia
di Hou, Meng, Santoro, Viviana, Biondi, Andrea, Shergill, Sukhi S and Premoli, Isabella 2021. A systematic review of TMS and neurophysiological biometrics in patients with schizophrenia. Journal of psychiatry & neuroscience : JPN. 46 (6), pp. E675-E701. https://doi.org/10.1503/jpn.210006