Evaluation of arts based courses within a UK recovery college for people with mental health challenges

Journal article


Stevens, J., Butterfield, C., Whittington, A. and Holttum, S. 2018. Evaluation of arts based courses within a UK recovery college for people with mental health challenges. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 15. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061170
AuthorsStevens, J., Butterfield, C., Whittington, A. and Holttum, S.
Abstract

No previous studies have evaluated arts based recovery college courses. Yet arts may assist in personal recovery, as often defined by service users, through social connection and personal meaning.

This interdisciplinary study evaluated (i) whether self-reported wellbeing and arts activities increased following arts based recovery college courses, and (ii) how students, peer trainers and artist-trainers understood courses’ impact. The design was mixed-methods. Of 42 service-user students enrolling, 39 completed a course and 37 consented to provide data. Of these, 14 completed pre and post course questionnaires on mental wellbeing and 28 on arts participation. Post course focus groups were held with 6 of 8 peer-trainers and 5 of 7 artist-trainers, and 28 students gave written feedback. Twenty-four students were interviewed up to three times in the subsequent nine months. There were statistically significant increases in self-reported mental wellbeing and range of arts activities following course attendance. At follow-up 17 of 24 students reported improved mental wellbeing, while 7 reported little or no change. Some spoke of increased social inclusion and continuing to use skills learned in the course to maintain wellbeing. Initial in course experience of ‘artistic growth’ predicted follow-up reports of improvement.

Future controlled studies should employ standardized measures of social inclusion and arts participation.

KeywordsArts; mental health; personal recovery; recovery college
Year2018
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Journal citation15
PublisherMDPI
ISSN1660-4601
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061170
FunderPaul Hamlyn Foundation
Publication dates
Print04 Jun 2018
Publication process dates
Deposited31 May 2018
Accepted30 May 2018
Accepted author manuscript
Output statusPublished
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Holttum, S. 1998. Express yourself? Research in brief. The Psychologist. 11 (6), pp. 296-296.
Is abstinence from alcohol dangerous? Research in brief
Holttum, S. 1998. Is abstinence from alcohol dangerous? Research in brief. The Psychologist. 11 (4), p. 186.
An investigation of the impact of training social workers and their managers
Duffy, T., Holttum, S. and Keegan, M. 1998. An investigation of the impact of training social workers and their managers. Alcoholism. 34 (1-2), pp. 93-104.
Personality style, psychological adaptation and expectations of trainee clinical psychologists
Brooks, J., Holttum, S. and Lavender, T. 2002. Personality style, psychological adaptation and expectations of trainee clinical psychologists. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy. 9 (4), pp. 253-270. https://doi.org/10.1002/cpp.318
Determinants of quality of life in black African women with HIV living in London
Onwumere, J., Holttum, S. and Hirst, F. 2002. Determinants of quality of life in black African women with HIV living in London. Psychology, Health and Medicine. 7 (1), pp. 61-74. https://doi.org/10.1080/13548500120101568
The relationship between acceptance and cognitive representations of pain in participants of a pain management programme
Rankin, H. and Holttum, S. 2003. The relationship between acceptance and cognitive representations of pain in participants of a pain management programme. Psychology, Health and Medicine. 8 (3), pp. 329-334. https://doi.org/10.1080/1354850031000135768
Factors influencing levels of research activity in clinical psychologists: a new model
Holttum, S. and Goble, L. 2006. Factors influencing levels of research activity in clinical psychologists: a new model. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy. 13 (5), pp. 339-351. https://doi.org/10.1002/cpp.501
Perceived improvements in service user involvement in two clinical psychology training courses
Holttum, S. and Hayward, M. 2010. Perceived improvements in service user involvement in two clinical psychology training courses. Psychology Learning & Teaching. 9 (1), pp. 16-24. https://doi.org/10.2304/plat.2010.9.1.16
WAIS III UK: an extension of the UK comparability study
Wycherley, R., Lavender, T., Holttum, S., Crawford, J. and Mockler, D. 2005. WAIS III UK: an extension of the UK comparability study. British Journal of Clinical Psychology. 44 (2), pp. 279-288. https://doi.org/10.1348/014466505X29440
Children's explanations of aggressive incidents at school within an attribution framework
Joscelyne, T. and Holttum, S. 2006. Children's explanations of aggressive incidents at school within an attribution framework. Child and Adolescent Mental Health. 11 (2), pp. 104-110. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-3588.2006.00397.x
How do women experience myocardial infarction? A qualitative exploration of illness perceptions, adjustment and coping
White, J., Hunter, M. and Holttum, S. 2007. How do women experience myocardial infarction? A qualitative exploration of illness perceptions, adjustment and coping. Psychology, Health and Medicine. 12 (3), pp. 278-288. https://doi.org/10.1080/13548500600971288
Reflections on involving service users and carers in clinical psychology training
Holttum, S. 2008. Reflections on involving service users and carers in clinical psychology training. The Higher Education Academy Psychology Network Newsletter. 48, pp. 2-3.
Perceived changes associated with autogenic training for anxiety: a grounded theory study
Yurdakul, L., Holttum, S. and Bowden, A. 2009. Perceived changes associated with autogenic training for anxiety: a grounded theory study. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory Research and Practice. 82 (4), pp. 403-419. https://doi.org/10.1348/147608309X444749
Comparative clinical feasibility study of three tools for delivery of cognitive behavioural therapy for mild to moderate depression and anxiety, provided on a self-help basis
Pittaway, S., Cupitt, C., Palmer, D., Arowobusoye, N., Milne, R., Holttum, S., Pezet, R. and Patrik, H. 2009. Comparative clinical feasibility study of three tools for delivery of cognitive behavioural therapy for mild to moderate depression and anxiety, provided on a self-help basis. Mental Health in Family Medicine. 6 (3), pp. 145-154.