Scaffolding: integrating social and cognitive perspectives on children’s learning at home

Journal article


Yuill, N. and Carr, A. 2018. Scaffolding: integrating social and cognitive perspectives on children’s learning at home. British Journal of Educational Psychology. 88 (2), pp. 171-173. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjep.12227
AuthorsYuill, N. and Carr, A.
Abstract

Since the translation and cultural assimilation of Vygotsky’s (1978) ideas into the English-speaking academic community from the 1970s, through thinkers such as Wertsch (1984), Vygotsky’s ideas continue to have a powerful influence in psychology and education, as well as being enthusiastically appropriated in other fields such as technology-mediated education (Luckin, 2003). As academics working across these disciplines, we felt the time was right to reflect on the use of socio-cultural theory, and the concept of scaffolding in particular, in understanding parent-child tutoring interactions at home, with reference to children’s academic achievement at school.

Thanks to funding from the British Psychological Society, we ran a series of three seminars, and this Special Issue arises from questions raised there.

Year2018
JournalBritish Journal of Educational Psychology
Journal citation88 (2), pp. 171-173
PublisherBritish Psychological Society
ISSN0007-0998
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1111/bjep.12227
FunderBritish Psychological Society
Publication dates
Online11 May 2018
Publication process dates
Deposited30 May 2018
Accepted17 Apr 2018
Accepted author manuscript
Output statusPublished
Additional information

Open Access

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