A qualitative analysis of the naming process of complementary and alternative medicine by chronically ill patients

Journal article


Chatterjee, A. 2018. A qualitative analysis of the naming process of complementary and alternative medicine by chronically ill patients. Complementary Therapies in Medicine. 41, pp. 306-310. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2018.10.011
AuthorsChatterjee, A.
Abstract

Objectives
A chronic illness/condition typically generates some disturbance in people. In the context of this turmoil, some individuals might make a choice to use healing options outside of regular allopathic medicine. This study is an attempt to understand the processes through which health practices/healing options get named as Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) by chronic illness patients.

Design and Setting
This study used a grounded theory methodology to collect and analyze data. Following the principles of theoretical sampling, in-depth face to face interviews were conducted with a total of 21 individuals with varied chronic illnesses/conditions residing in Miami. The study sample constituted of 16 women and 5 men, belonging to different ethnicities and using varied health practices and healing options.

Findings
Through the findings it is suggested, that there is nothing definite about the definition of CAM. Individuals name and rename activities and health practices as CAM based on their perceptions and the way they approach such health practices/healing options. The naming process of CAM is contextual and even food and activities or pastimes can get named as CAM if they hold meaning for a person.

Conclusion
Research in the US continually shows that CAM is widely used, but what actually constitutes CAM differs based on whom you ask. Whether what can be named as CAM should be circumscribed or left open is a debate that has policy implications and needs to be explored by future researchers.

KeywordsNaming; Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM); Chronic illness
Year2018
JournalComplementary Therapies in Medicine
Journal citation41, pp. 306-310
PublisherElsevier
ISSN 0965-2299
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2018.10.011
Official URLhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2018.10.011
Publication dates
Online17 Oct 2018
Publication process dates
Accepted15 Oct 2018
Deposited13 Sep 2021
Output statusPublished
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https://repository.canterbury.ac.uk/item/8yq44/a-qualitative-analysis-of-the-naming-process-of-complementary-and-alternative-medicine-by-chronically-ill-patients

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