Healthworlds, cultural health toolkits, and choice: How acculturation affects patients’ views of prescription drugs and Prescription Drug Advertising

Journal article


Adams, C., Harder, B. M., Chatterjee, A. and Hayes Mathias, L. 2019. Healthworlds, cultural health toolkits, and choice: How acculturation affects patients’ views of prescription drugs and Prescription Drug Advertising. Qualitative Health Research. 29 (10), pp. 1419-1432. https://doi.org/10.1177/1049732319827282
AuthorsAdams, C., Harder, B. M., Chatterjee, A. and Hayes Mathias, L.
Abstract

How do minorities differ from Whites in their interactions with the broader consumeristic health culture in the United States? We explore this question by investigating the role that acculturation plays in minority and White patients’ views of prescription drugs and the direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of prescription drugs. Drawing on data from six race-based focus groups, we find that patients’ views of prescription drugs affect their responses to DTCA. While both minorities and Whites value the information they receive from DTCA, level of acculturation predicts how minorities use the information they receive from DTCA. Less acculturated minorities have healthworlds and cultural health toolkits that are not narrowly focused on prescription drugs. This results in skepticism on the part of less acculturated minorities toward pharmaceuticals as treatment options. In this article, we argue that researchers must consider the role acculturation plays in explaining patients’ health dispositions and their consumeristic health orientations.

KeywordsBehaviour; Traditional medicine; Folk medicine; Minorites; Culture; Cultural competence; Health behaviour; Consumerism; United States; Marketing
Year2019
JournalQualitative Health Research
Journal citation29 (10), pp. 1419-1432
PublisherSAGE Journals
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1177/1049732319827282
Official URLhttps://doi.org/10.1177/1049732319827282
Publication dates
Print01 Aug 2019
Publication process dates
Deposited13 Sep 2021
Output statusPublished
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https://repository.canterbury.ac.uk/item/8yq43/healthworlds-cultural-health-toolkits-and-choice-how-acculturation-affects-patients-views-of-prescription-drugs-and-prescription-drug-advertising

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