The development of a screening tool to evaluate gross motor function in HIV-infected infants

Journal article


Hilburn, N., Potterton, J., Stewart, A. and Becker, P. 2011. The development of a screening tool to evaluate gross motor function in HIV-infected infants. AIDS Care. 23 (12), pp. 1619-25. https://doi.org/10.1080/09540121.2011.579942
AuthorsHilburn, N., Potterton, J., Stewart, A. and Becker, P.
Abstract

Neurodevelopmental delay or HIV encephalopathy is a stage four disease indicator for paediatric HIV/AIDS according to the World Health Organisation (WHO), and may be used as a criterion for initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). To date, the only means of prevention of this condition is early initiation of HAART. Studies which have been carried out in South African clinics have revealed the high prevalence of this condition. In developing countries, commencement of HAART is based on declining virologic and immunologic status, as standardised neurodevelopmental assessment tools are not widely available. A standardised developmental screening tool which is suitable for use in a developing country is therefore necessary in order to screen for neurodevelopmental delay to allow for further assessment and referral to rehabilitation services, as well as providing an additional assessment criterion for initiation of HAART. The infant gross motor screening test (IGMST) was developed for this purpose. The standardisation sample of the IGMST consisted of 112 HIV-infected infants between six and 18 months of age. Item selection for the IGMST was based on the Gross Motor scale of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID)-III. Content validity was assessed by a panel of experts using a nominal group technique (NGT; agreement >80%). Concurrent validity (n=60) of the IGMST was carried out against the BSID-III, and agreement was excellent (K=0.85). The diagnostic properties of the IGMST were evaluated and revealed: sensitivity 97.4%, specificity 85.7%, positive predictive value (PPV) 92.7%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 94.7%. Reliability testing (n=30) revealed inter-rater reliability as: r=1, test-retest reliability: r=0.98 and intra-rater reliability: r=0.98. The results indicate that the statistical properties of the IGMST are excellent, and the tool is suitable for use within the paediatric HIV setting.

KeywordsHIV,; Neurodevelopment; Encephalopathy; Antiretrovirals
Year2011
JournalAIDS Care
Journal citation23 (12), pp. 1619-25
PublisherTaylor and Francis Online
ISSN0954-0121
1360-0451
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1080/09540121.2011.579942
Official URLhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09540121.2011.579942
FunderCarnegie Corporation
Publication dates
Online16 Jun 2011
Publication process dates
Accepted06 Apr 2011
Deposited02 Nov 2023
Output statusPublished
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