Bystander responses to bias-based bullying in schools: a developmental intergroup approach

Journal article


Palmer, S. and Abbott, N. 2017. Bystander responses to bias-based bullying in schools: a developmental intergroup approach. Child Development Perspectives. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12253
AuthorsPalmer, S. and Abbott, N.
Abstract

Research on bystander responses to bullying shows the valuable contribution that prosocial or defending bystander behaviours can have in reducing bullying in schools. We propose that a developmental intergroup approach (i.e., children’s developing understanding of social identities and related intergroup processes) is required to fully understand when and why children and adolescents do or do not help bullied peers in diverse contexts. We first review well-established theory and evidence from intergroup social exclusion literature to demonstrate the strength of a developmental intergroup approach when understanding responses to complex social scenarios across childhood and into adolescence. We then review recent evidence that demonstrates the importance of examining group membership, group identity and group norms to understand children and adolescents’ bystander responses in bias-based bullying contexts. Finally, we consider implications for school-based interventions and next steps for research on bystander responses in childhood and adolescence.

Year2017
JournalChild Development Perspectives
PublisherWiley
ISSN1750-8592
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12253
Related URLhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
Publication dates
Online21 Sep 2017
Publication process dates
Deposited30 Aug 2017
Accepted21 Aug 2017
Accepted author manuscript
Output statusPublished
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https://repository.canterbury.ac.uk/item/884z8/bystander-responses-to-bias-based-bullying-in-schools-a-developmental-intergroup-approach

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