Radiography of human dry bones: A reflective account with recommendations for practice.

Journal article


Elliott, J. 2021. Radiography of human dry bones: A reflective account with recommendations for practice. Radiography. https://doi.org/S1078-8174(21)00171-1
AuthorsElliott, J.
AbstractThis study presents the reflective account of a large-scale radiographic survey of medieval and post-medieval long bones from St Albans, United Kingdom. As a practicing diagnostic radiographer and archaeologist, the author sought to apply experiential learning to generate recommendations for archaeological and forensic radiography practice. The purpose of the imaging was to identify Harris lines for biological stress, however this reflective piece concerns the adaptation of clinical radiographic technique for human dry bones. Imaging took place over five sessions in early 2021 with the assistance of an osteoarchaeologist. Radiography followed standard clinical views (anterior-posterior and medio-lateral) of femora, humeri, radii and tibiae using a digital radiography system. A workplace diary was used to record challenges, solutions and musings related to radiographic technique. The Rolfe, Freshwater and Jasper reflective model was applied to collate and present findings. A total of 502 radiographs of 426 long bones (92 individuals) were acquired. A multidisciplinary team was found to be essential for correct identification of anatomy, laterality and orientation of remains during the survey. Anterior-posterior views were easiest to achieve, with medio-lateral imaging requiring considerably more effort. Radiolucent sponge supports were necessary, although fragmented remains were often impossible to position accurately. Hands-on experience of human bones improved the author's knowledge and confidence with osteology. Although limited to selective long bones of archaeological context and personal experience, the findings of this study have direct applications for forensic radiography practice. This includes use of a multidisciplinary team, robust workflow with integrated failsafe checks, consistent imaging approach and the application of radiolucent sponge supports. Recommendations within this study may contribute towards a comprehensive guide for radiographic technique for human dry bones. [Abstract copyright: Copyright © 2021 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.]
KeywordsArchaeology; Technique; Multidisciplinary; Osteology; Workflow; Forensic
Year2021
JournalRadiography
PublisherElsevier
ISSN1532-2831
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/S1078-8174(21)00171-1
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.radi.2021.10.011
Official URLhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1078817421001711
Publication dates
Online23 Oct 2021
Publication process dates
Accepted11 Oct 2021
Deposited13 May 2022
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Output statusPublished
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https://repository.canterbury.ac.uk/item/90xzy/radiography-of-human-dry-bones-a-reflective-account-with-recommendations-for-practice

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