Giving guys get the guys: Men appear more desirable to the opposite sex when displaying costly donations to the homeless

Journal article


Iredale, W., Jenner, K., Van Vugt, M. and Dempster, T. 2020. Giving guys get the guys: Men appear more desirable to the opposite sex when displaying costly donations to the homeless . Social Sciences. 9 (8), p. 141. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9080141
AuthorsIredale, W., Jenner, K., Van Vugt, M. and Dempster, T.
Abstract

One of the evolutionary adaptive benefits of altruism may be that it acts as an honest (reliable) signal of men’s mate quality. In this study, 285 female participants were shown one of three video scenarios in which a male target took £30 out of a cash machine (ATM) and gave either a lot (£30), a little (£1), or nothing to a homeless man. The participants rated the male target on his attractiveness, their short- and long-term mate preferences towards him, and the degree to which
they thought he was likely to possess various parenting qualities. The results showed that, regardless of whether the man was described as rich or poor, participants rated him as being more attractive
when he donated money, but only when the donation was costly (£30). In addition, altruism was shown to be important in long-term, but not short-term mate choice, and displays of altruism were associated with positive parenting qualities. It is argued that displays of altruism act as a reliable (honest) mate signal for a potential long-term parental partner

KeywordsAltruism; Costly signalling; Attraction; Parenting qualities ; Mate choice
Year2020
JournalSocial Sciences
Journal citation9 (8), p. 141
PublisherMDPI
ISSN2076-0760
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9080141
Official URLhttps://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9080141
Publication dates
Print11 Aug 2020
Publication process dates
Accepted06 Aug 2020
Deposited12 Aug 2020
Accepted author manuscript
License
File Access Level
Open
Output statusPublished
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https://repository.canterbury.ac.uk/item/8w010/giving-guys-get-the-guys-men-appear-more-desirable-to-the-opposite-sex-when-displaying-costly-donations-to-the-homeless

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