Policing and mental health: do we really get it?

Book chapter


Williams, E., Norman, J. and Brown, M. 2019. Policing and mental health: do we really get it? in: Policing and Mental Health Routledge.
AuthorsWilliams, E., Norman, J. and Brown, M.
Abstract

This chapter draws on research undertaken in a large Metropolitan force in England and Wales and presents two case studies which problematise the issue of policing and mental health in two environments. Both scenarios discuss the implications of inadequate problem definition in the police and mental health context, the impact on the type of knowledge applied in decision making, the differing elements of risk that this poses and the need for police practitioners to work with other health professionals in these situations to improve outcomes.

The first case study is based on research which sought to define victim typologies in rape cases in London following reviews focused on the long term and continuing problem with attrition (cases leaving the criminal justice process at the police stage) (Stern, 2010; Angiolini, 2015). This is despite the implementation of a dedicated rape project to prioritise improving this area of policing in 2000.

The second case study is based on a piece of work which explored practitioners’ perceptions of dealing with mental health and vulnerability in custody suites, the missed opportunities within that environment to glean data about the client population and the impact this has on decisions to deliver more proactive strategies to improve outcomes.

Both case studies strongly reinforce the need to better understand the complexity of both individual and context specific demand when dealing with vulnerability and mental health in policing.

Year2019
Book titlePolicing and Mental Health
PublisherRoutledge
Publication process dates
Deposited05 Mar 2019
Accepted09 Jan 2019
Permalink -

https://repository.canterbury.ac.uk/item/88yxx/policing-and-mental-health-do-we-really-get-it

  • 17
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 0
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

Policing vulnerability: attrition, rape and domestic violence
Williams, E., Norman, J. and Barrow-Grint, K. 2020. Policing vulnerability: attrition, rape and domestic violence. in: Pepper, I.K. and McGrath, R. (ed.) Introduction to Professional Policing: Examining the Evidence Base London Routledge.
Direct Entry: Fairness, resilience and the impact on regular cops
Williams, E. and Norman, J. 2020. Direct Entry: Fairness, resilience and the impact on regular cops. International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice.
Changes to police leadership: the legitimisation and the challenges of direct entry
Williams, E. and Scott, S. 2019. Changes to police leadership: the legitimisation and the challenges of direct entry. in: Ramshaw, P., Silvestri, M. and Simpson, M. (ed.) Police Leadership: Changing Landscapes Palgrave mcmillan.
The police education qualification framework: a professional agenda or building professionals?
Williams, E., Norman, J. and Rowe, M. 2019. The police education qualification framework: a professional agenda or building professionals? Police Practice and Research.
Violence against women: public health or law enforcement problem or both?
Williams, E., Norman, J. and Nixon, K. 2018. Violence against women: public health or law enforcement problem or both? International Journal of Police Science and Management. 20 (3), pp. 196-206.
Understanding risks: practitioner’s perceptions of the lottery of mental health care available for detainees in custody
Williams, E., Norman, J. and Sondhi, A. 2017. Understanding risks: practitioner’s perceptions of the lottery of mental health care available for detainees in custody. Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice.
Patient perspectives of being detained under section 136 of the Mental Health Act: findings from a qualitative study in London
Sondhi, A., luger, L., Toleikyte, L. and Williams, E. 2018. Patient perspectives of being detained under section 136 of the Mental Health Act: findings from a qualitative study in London. Medicine, Science and the Law. 58 (3), pp. 159-167.
Mediating serious crime: an analysis of victim and prisoner mediation
Tong, S., Waters, B., Bryant, R., Williams, E. and Norman, J. 2017. Mediating serious crime: an analysis of victim and prisoner mediation.
Putting learning into practice: self-reflections from cops
Norman, J. and Williams, E. 2017. Putting learning into practice: self-reflections from cops. European Police Science and Research Bulletin - Special Conference Edition.
Knowledge wars: professionalisation, organisational justice and competing knowledge paradigms in British Policing
Williams, E. 2018. Knowledge wars: professionalisation, organisational justice and competing knowledge paradigms in British Policing. in: Huey, L. and Mitchell, R. (ed.) Evidence-Based Policing: An Introduction Policy Press.
Health needs and co-morbidity among detainees in contact with healthcare professionals within police custody across the London Metropolitan Police Service area
Sondhi, A. and Williams, E. 2017. Health needs and co-morbidity among detainees in contact with healthcare professionals within police custody across the London Metropolitan Police Service area. Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine. 57, pp. 96-100.
A new canteen culture: the potential to use social media as evidence in policing
Williams, E. and Hesketh, I. 2017. A new canteen culture: the potential to use social media as evidence in policing. Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice. 11 (3), pp. 346-355.
Mediating serious crime: an analysis of adult prison restorative justice mediation
Bryant, R., Tong, S., Waters, B., Williams, E. and Norman, J. 2014. Mediating serious crime: an analysis of adult prison restorative justice mediation. London Nuffield Foundation.
Too little too late: assessing vulnerability
Williams, E., Norman, J. and Wünsch, D. 2009. Too little too late: assessing vulnerability. Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice. 3 (4), pp. 355-363.