‘“Friend with the musing eye”: persuasion and dissonance in “call to arms” poems of the First World War’

Book chapter


Palmer, A. 2016. ‘“Friend with the musing eye”: persuasion and dissonance in “call to arms” poems of the First World War’. in: Owen, D. and Pividori, C. (ed.) Writings of Persuasion and Dissonance in the Great War: That Better Whiles May Follow Worse. Amsterdam Brill Rodopi. pp. 138-151
AuthorsPalmer, A.
EditorsOwen, D. and Pividori, C.
Abstract

The English poetry arising out of the First World War is commonly represented as expressing either the persuasive or the dissonant voice. Some poems, to be sure, were politically-motivated expressions of one or other position, constructed out of versified rhetoric. However, while recognising these works, I argue that the strongest poetry of the war problematises the terms of that debate, offering ambiguity, nuance and contradiction in a mode that is specifically poetic.

Page range138-151
Year2016
Book titleWritings of Persuasion and Dissonance in the Great War: That Better Whiles May Follow Worse.
PublisherBrill Rodopi
Output statusPublished
Place of publicationAmsterdam
EditionFirst
ISBN9789004314917
Publication dates
Print31 Mar 2016
Publication process dates
Deposited07 Feb 2019
Permalink -

https://repository.canterbury.ac.uk/item/88yqw/-friend-with-the-musing-eye-persuasion-and-dissonance-in-call-to-arms-poems-of-the-first-world-war

  • 18
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 1
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

Modernism and First World War poetry: alternative lines
Palmer, A. and Minogue, S. 2015. Modernism and First World War poetry: alternative lines. in: Davis, A. and Jenkins, L. (ed.) A History of Modernist Poetry Cambridge Cambridge University Press. pp. 227-251
The remembered dead: poetry, memory and the First World War
Minogue, S. and Palmer, A. 2018. The remembered dead: poetry, memory and the First World War. Cambridge Cambridge University Press.
Confronting the abject: women and dead babies in modern English fiction
Minogue, S. and Palmer, A. 2006. Confronting the abject: women and dead babies in modern English fiction. Journal of Modern Literature. 29 (3), pp. 103-125.
‘“In a land that I love”: working-class identity and the end of empire in Ray Davies’ Arthur or the Decline and Fall of the British Empire
Palmer, A. 2013. ‘“In a land that I love”: working-class identity and the end of empire in Ray Davies’ Arthur or the Decline and Fall of the British Empire. Popular Music & Society. 36 (4). https://doi.org/10.1080/03007766.2012.753705
'Horrors here smile': the poem, the photograph and the punctum
Minogue, S. and Palmer, A. 2013. 'Horrors here smile': the poem, the photograph and the punctum. Word & Image. 29 (2), pp. 203-211. https://doi.org/10.1080/02666286.2012.707004
’In the shade of a ghost gum’: Bruce Chatwin and the rhetoric of the desert
Palmer, A. 2011. ’In the shade of a ghost gum’: Bruce Chatwin and the rhetoric of the desert. English: The Journal of the English Association. 60 (231), pp. 311-335. https://doi.org/10.1093/english/efr033
Memorial poems and the poetics of memorializing
Palmer, A. and Minogue, S. 2010. Memorial poems and the poetics of memorializing. Journal of Modern Literature. 34 (1), pp. 162-181. https://doi.org/10.2979/JML.2010.34.1.162
Wanderers and settlers: Bruce Chatwin and the “Jewish element"
Palmer, A. 1999. Wanderers and settlers: Bruce Chatwin and the “Jewish element". The Jewish Quarterly.
'In the shade of a ghost gum’: Bruce Chatwin and the rhetoric of the desert
Palmer, A. 2008. 'In the shade of a ghost gum’: Bruce Chatwin and the rhetoric of the desert.
George Orwell and British antisemitism
Palmer, A. 1998. George Orwell and British antisemitism. Jewish Quarterly. 172, pp. 41-45.
Isaac, My Brother
Palmer, A. 2001. Isaac, My Brother. The Jewish Quarterly. 184, pp. 7-14.
(Re)-visiting Der Heim: the amazing return to the place you've never been which isn’t there
Palmer, A. 2002. (Re)-visiting Der Heim: the amazing return to the place you've never been which isn’t there. in: Siegel, K. (ed.) Issues in Travel Writing: Empire, Spectacle, and Displacement Peter Lang. pp. 245-251
Helter skelter, topsy-turvy and ‘loonycolour’: carnivalesque realism in 'Saturday Night and Sunday Morning'
Minogue, S. and Palmer, A. 2002. Helter skelter, topsy-turvy and ‘loonycolour’: carnivalesque realism in 'Saturday Night and Sunday Morning'. English: The Journal of the English Association. 51, pp. 127-143.