Disability, spinal cord injury, and strength and conditioning: sociological considerations

Journal article


Brighton, J. 2018. Disability, spinal cord injury, and strength and conditioning: sociological considerations. Strength and Conditioning Journal. 40 (6), pp. 29-39. https://doi.org/10.1519/SSC.0000000000000419
AuthorsBrighton, J.
Abstract

Little knowledge is available for strength and conditioning coaches' (SCCs) to develop strength and conditioning (S&C) programs with athletes with a disability. Knowledge that is available is 'bioscientific' with scant consideration of how dominant understandings of disability are constructed or how disability is experienced.

In response, this paper provides a conceptual overview of disability and reflections from the authors published research into disability sport and spinal cord injury (SCI) to question the tacit knowledge used in S&C and the influence this has on SCC/athlete relationships. Guidelines to develop more reciprocal and empowering practices with athletes with a disability are advocated.

KeywordsDisability; spinal cord injury; sociology
Year2018
JournalStrength and Conditioning Journal
Journal citation40 (6), pp. 29-39
PublisherWolters Kluwer
ISSN1524-1602
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1519/SSC.0000000000000419
Publication dates
Print01 Dec 2018
Publication process dates
Deposited23 Oct 2018
Accepted03 Aug 2018
Accepted author manuscript
Output statusPublished
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