Fields of struggle: a Bourdieusian analysis of conflicts over criminal justice in England, c. 1820-1850

Journal article


Tennant, M. 2014. Fields of struggle: a Bourdieusian analysis of conflicts over criminal justice in England, c. 1820-1850. Social History. 39 (1), pp. 36-55. https://doi.org/10.1080/03071022.2013.875712
AuthorsTennant, M.
Abstract

The nineteenth century ‘revolution in government’, from which a dramatically altered relationship between central and local government emerged, is of central concern to social historians. This article uses the work of Pierre Bourdieu to analyse the struggles between the magistracy in Cheshire and the Home Office over the centralisation of prisons and policing between the 1820s and 1840s. During this period legislative enactments increased the role of central government in monitoring and overseeing administrative management in both areas and this produced both direct and indirect conflict. The article argues that Bourdieu’s concepts of ‘field’, ‘capital’ and ‘habitus’ provide a framework for analysing the changing relationship between central and local government which makes evident the effects of divisions between and within social classes and enables the varying nature of the course and outcome of conflicts to be understood. Overall the analysis demonstrates the potential of the approach to be used more widely to explore the changing relationship between central and local government in other areas of social policy.

Year2014
JournalSocial History
Journal citation39 (1), pp. 36-55
PublisherTaylor & Francis
ISSN0307-1022
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1080/03071022.2013.875712
Publication dates
Online19 Mar 2014
Publication process dates
Deposited18 May 2016
Accepted12 Dec 2013
Output statusPublished
File
Permalink -

https://repository.canterbury.ac.uk/item/87v65/fields-of-struggle-a-bourdieusian-analysis-of-conflicts-over-criminal-justice-in-england-c-1820-1850

Download files

  • 24
    total views
  • 173
    total downloads
  • 2
    views this month
  • 3
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

The pain of others: photographs, the prison and suffering
Tennant, M. 2018. The pain of others: photographs, the prison and suffering.
The university and the prison: an update on constructing heritage at Canterbury
Tennant, M. 2018. The university and the prison: an update on constructing heritage at Canterbury.
Prison history and the ethics of public engagement
Tennant, M. 2018. Prison history and the ethics of public engagement.
Penal heritage: approaches to interpretation
Tennant, M. 2017. Penal heritage: approaches to interpretation.
From darkness to light: portrait pictures in the Bảo Tàng Côn Đảo Museum
Tennant, M. 2018. From darkness to light: portrait pictures in the Bảo Tàng Côn Đảo Museum. in: Sophie Fuggle, Charles Fox, Charles Forsdick, Katharina Massing (ed.) A Poetics of Space: Images of Côn Đảo London Pavement Books. pp. 25-28
The Police that never was: Peel, Melbourne and the Cheshire Constabulary, 1829-1856
Tennant, M. 2017. The Police that never was: Peel, Melbourne and the Cheshire Constabulary, 1829-1856.
Challenging the penal present: developing and representing a critical history of the prison
Tennant, M. 2017. Challenging the penal present: developing and representing a critical history of the prison.
A critical history of the prison: using the past to challenge the present
Tennant, M. 2017. A critical history of the prison: using the past to challenge the present.
"There is a crack in everything; it's where the light gets in": some reflections on producing ethical prison heritage
Tennant, M. 2017. "There is a crack in everything; it's where the light gets in": some reflections on producing ethical prison heritage.
Criminology picks up the gauntlet: responses to the Whole Earth exhibition
Hallenberg, K. and Tennant, M. 2015. Criminology picks up the gauntlet: responses to the Whole Earth exhibition.
Criminology picks up the gauntlet: responses to the Whole Earth exhibition
Hallenberg, K. and Tennant, M. 2016. Criminology picks up the gauntlet: responses to the Whole Earth exhibition. in: Woodfield, K. (ed.) Inspire – Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences HEA.