Prevalence and factors associated with the use of long-acting reversible and permanent contraceptive methods among women who desire no more children in high fertility countries in sub-saharan Africa.

Journal article


Bolarinwa, Obasanjo Afolabi, Afaya, Agani, Ajayi, Kobi V, Ojo, Abimbola and Alawode, Oluwatobi Abel 2022. Prevalence and factors associated with the use of long-acting reversible and permanent contraceptive methods among women who desire no more children in high fertility countries in sub-saharan Africa. BMC Public Health. 22 (1), p. 2141. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-022-14575-x
AuthorsBolarinwa, Obasanjo Afolabi, Afaya, Agani, Ajayi, Kobi V, Ojo, Abimbola and Alawode, Oluwatobi Abel
AbstractThe proportion of women with family planning needs increased from 74 to 76% between 2000 and 2019, and this improvement has not transcended to a fertility rate stall or decrease in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). In the face of a continuous increase in the fertility rate in SSA, population experts agreed that the efficient use of reliable family planning methods such as long-acting reversible and permanent contraceptive methods (LARC/PMs) could help reduce the high fertility rate and associated adverse reproductive health outcomes in the region. However, despite the effectiveness of LARC/PMs, its use remains elusive in SSA. Thus, this study examines the prevalence and factors associated with the use of LARC/PMs among women who desire no more children in high-fertility countries in SSA. Secondary datasets from the demographic health surveys conducted in 20 countries in SSA between 2010 and 2019 were included in the study. A total sample size of 46,290 sexually active women of reproductive age who desire no more children and who met the study inclusion criteria was pooled and analysed. Prevalence of LARC/PMs use was displayed using a graph whilst binary logistic regression was used to determine the associated factors, and results were presented as unadjusted odds ratio and adjusted odds ratio with a statistical significance of p < 0.05. The prevalence of LARC/PMs use among women who desire no more children was 7.5%. Ranging from 20.9% in Senegal and as low as 0.4% in Congo. Women within the richest wealth index [aOR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.03-1.36] and those exposed to mass media [aOR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.41-1.68] had higher odds of LARC/PMs use among sexually active women of reproductive age who desire no more children compared to those within poorest wealth index and women with no mass media exposure. The study concluded that LARC/PMs use among sexually active women who desire no more children was very low, and women within the richest wealth index and those with mass media exposure were likely to use LARC/PMs. Interventions that will encourage using LARC/PMs should be prioritised to reduce fertility rates in SSA. [Abstract copyright: © 2022. The Author(s).]
KeywordsLong-acting reversible contraceptives; Sub-Saharan Africa; Women who desire no more children; DHS; Permanent contraceptives
Year2022
JournalBMC Public Health
Journal citation22 (1), p. 2141
PublisherBMC
ISSN1471-2458
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-022-14575-x
Official URLhttps://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-022-14575-x
Publication dates
Online21 Nov 2022
Publication process dates
Accepted08 Nov 2022
Deposited07 Dec 2022
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Output statusPublished
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https://repository.canterbury.ac.uk/item/934w3/prevalence-and-factors-associated-with-the-use-of-long-acting-reversible-and-permanent-contraceptive-methods-among-women-who-desire-no-more-children-in-high-fertility-countries-in-sub-saharan-africa

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