Exploring adults’ experiences of sedentary behaviour and participation in nonworkplace interventions designed to reduce sedentary behaviour: a thematic synthesis of qualitative studies

Journal article


Williams, R, Rawlings, G, Clarke, D., English, C., Fitzsimons, C., Holloway, I., Lawton, R., Mead, G., Patel, A. and Forster, A. 2019. Exploring adults’ experiences of sedentary behaviour and participation in nonworkplace interventions designed to reduce sedentary behaviour: a thematic synthesis of qualitative studies. BMC Public Health. 19 (1), p. 1099.
AuthorsWilliams, R, Rawlings, G, Clarke, D., English, C., Fitzsimons, C., Holloway, I., Lawton, R., Mead, G., Patel, A. and Forster, A.
Abstract

Background: Sedentary behaviour is any waking behaviour characterised by an energy expenditure of ≤1.5 metabolic equivalent of task while in a sitting or reclining posture. Prolonged bouts of sedentary behaviour have been associated with negative health outcomes in all age groups. We examined qualitative research investigating perceptions and experiences of sedentary behaviour and of participation in non-workplace interventions designed to reduce sedentary behaviour in adult populations.

Method: A systematic search of seven databases (MEDLINE, AMED, Cochrane, PsychINFO, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL and Web of Science) was conducted in September 2017. Studies were assessed for methodological quality and a thematic synthesis was conducted. Prospero database ID: CRD42017083436.

Results: Thirty individual studies capturing the experiences of 918 individuals were included. Eleven studies examined experiences and/or perceptions of sedentary behaviour in older adults (typically ≥60 years); ten studies focused on sedentary behaviour in people experiencing a clinical condition, four explored influences on sedentary behaviour in adults living in socio-economically disadvantaged communities, two examined university students’ experiences of sedentary behaviour, two on those of working-age adults, and one focused on cultural influences on sedentary behaviour. Three analytical themes were identified: 1) the impact of different life stages on sedentary behaviour 2) lifestyle factors influencing sedentary behaviour and 3) barriers and facilitators to changing sedentary behaviour.

Conclusions: Sedentary behaviour is multifaceted and influenced by a complex interaction between individual, environmental and socio-cultural factors. Micro and macro pressures are experienced at different life stages and in the context of illness; these shape individuals’ beliefs and behaviour related to sedentariness. Knowledge of sedentary behaviour and the associated health consequences appears limited in adult populations, therefore there is a need for provision of accessible information about ways in which sedentary behaviour reduction can be integrated in people’s daily lives. Interventions targeting a reduction in sedentary behaviour need to consider the multiple influences on sedentariness when designing and implementing interventions.

KeywordsSedentary behaviour ; Sitting ; Qualitative research ; Physical activity ; Thematic synthesis
Year2019
JournalBMC Public Health
Journal citation19 (1), p. 1099
PublisherBMC (part of Springer Nature)
ISSN1471-2458
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1186/s12889-019-7365-1
Official URLhttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-019-7365-1
FunderNational Institute for Health Research
Publication dates
Online13 Aug 2019
Publication process dates
Accepted24 Jul 2019
Deposited27 Feb 2020
Accepted author manuscript
File Access Level
Open
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https://repository.canterbury.ac.uk/item/8qx17/exploring-adults-experiences-of-sedentary-behaviour-and-participation-in-nonworkplace-interventions-designed-to-reduce-sedentary-behaviour-a-thematic-synthesis-of-qualitative-studies

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