Long-term outcomes of cognitive-behavior therapy for adolescent body dysmorphic disorder

Journal article


Krebs, G., Fernández de la Cruz, L., Monzani, B., Bowyer, L., Anson, M., Cadman, J., Turner, C., Heyman, I., Veale, D. and Mataix-Cols, D. 2017. Long-term outcomes of cognitive-behavior therapy for adolescent body dysmorphic disorder. Behavior Therapy. 48 (4), pp. 462-473. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.beth.2017.01.001
AuthorsKrebs, G., Fernández de la Cruz, L., Monzani, B., Bowyer, L., Anson, M., Cadman, J., Turner, C., Heyman, I., Veale, D. and Mataix-Cols, D.
Abstract

Emerging evidence suggests that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious treatment for adolescent body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in the short term, but longer-term outcomes remain unknown. The current study aimed to follow up a group of adolescents who had originally participated in a randomized controlled trial of CBT for BDD to determine whether treatment gains were maintained. Twenty-six adolescents (mean age = 16.2, SD = 1.6) with a primary diagnosis of BDD received a course of developmentally tailored CBT and were followed up over 12 months. Participants were assessed at baseline, midtreatment, posttreatment, 2-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure was the clinician-rated Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale Modified for BDD. Secondary outcomes included measures of insight, depression, quality of life, and global functioning. BDD symptoms decreased significantly from pre- to posttreatment and remained stable over the 12-month follow-up. At this time point, 50% of participants were classified as responders and 23% as remitters. Participants remained significantly improved on all secondary outcomes at 12-month follow-up. Neither baseline insight nor baseline depression predicted long-term outcomes. The positive effects of CBT appear to be durable up to 12-month follow-up. However, the majority of patients remained symptomatic and vulnerable to a range of risks at 12-month follow-up, indicating that longer-term monitoring is advisable in this population. Future research should focus on enhancing the efficacy of CBT in order to improve long-term outcomes.

KeywordsBody dysmorphic disorder; children; adolescents; cognitive-behavioral therapy
Year2017
JournalBehavior Therapy
Journal citation48 (4), pp. 462-473
PublisherElsevier
ISSN0005-7894
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1016/j.beth.2017.01.001
Official URLhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0005789417300023
Related URLhttps://www.elsevier.com/
FunderNational Institute for Health Research
Publication dates
Online10 Jan 2017
Publication process dates
Deposited06 Sep 2017
Accepted04 Jan 2017
Output statusPublished
Permalink -

https://repository.canterbury.ac.uk/item/88528/long-term-outcomes-of-cognitive-behavior-therapy-for-adolescent-body-dysmorphic-disorder

  • 8
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 1
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

Social anxiety in adult males with autism spectrum disorders
Spain, D., Happe, F., Johnston, P., Campbell, M., Sin, J., Daly, E., Ecker, C., Anson, M., Chaplin, E., Glaser, K., Mendez, A., Lovell, K. and Murphy, D. 2016. Social anxiety in adult males with autism spectrum disorders. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders. 32, pp. 13-23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rasd.2016.08.002
The effect of self-focused attention and mood on appearance dissatisfaction after mirror-gazing: an experimental study
Veale, D., Miles, S., Valiallah, N., Butt, S., Anson, M., Eshkevari, E., Gledhill, L. and Baldock, E. 2016. The effect of self-focused attention and mood on appearance dissatisfaction after mirror-gazing: an experimental study. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry. 52, pp. 38-44. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbtep.2016.03.002
A pilot randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy for adolescents with body dysmorphic disorder
Matiax-Cols, D., de la Cruz, L., Isomura, K., Anson, M., Turner, C., Maonzani, B., Cadman, J., Bowyer, L., Heyman, I., Veale, D. and Krebs, G. 2015. A pilot randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy for adolescents with body dysmorphic disorder. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. 54 (11), pp. 895-904. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2015.08.011
Long term outcome of cognitive behavior therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: a naturalistic case series of 1 to 4 years after a controlled trial
Veale, D., Miles, S. and Anson, M. 2015. Long term outcome of cognitive behavior therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: a naturalistic case series of 1 to 4 years after a controlled trial. Behavior Therapy. 46 (6), pp. 775-785. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.beth.2015.06.003
Efficacy of cognitive behaviour therapy versus anxiety management for body dysmorphic disorder: a randomised controlled trial
Veale, D., Anson, M., Miles, S., Pieta, M., Costa, A. and Ellison, N. 2014. Efficacy of cognitive behaviour therapy versus anxiety management for body dysmorphic disorder: a randomised controlled trial. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. 83 (6), pp. 341-353. https://doi.org/10.1159/000360740
Appearance comparison in individuals with body dysmorphic disorder and controls
Anson, M., Veale, D. and Miles, S. 2015. Appearance comparison in individuals with body dysmorphic disorder and controls. Body Image. 15, pp. 132-140. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bodyim.2015.08.003