Group playing by ear in higher education: the processes that support imitation, invention and group improvisation

Lecture


Varvarigou, M. 2016. Group playing by ear in higher education: the processes that support imitation, invention and group improvisation.
AuthorsVarvarigou, M.
TypeLecture
Description

The study presented here explored how group playing by ear, or Group Ear Playing (GEP), through the imitation of recorded material and opportunities for inventive work during peer interaction supported first year undergraduate western classical music students’ aural, creative and improvisation skills. The approach to playing by ear adopted in this study is based on Lucy Green’s (2014) work on the use of informal learning practices in formal music education. The framework that emerged from the analysis of the data describes two routes taken by the students, whilst progressing from GEP to group improvisation. This study advocates that through playing by ear in groups western classical musicians within Higher Education can develop their creative, collaborative and improvisation skills.

Year2016
ConferenceNew Directions for Performance and Music Teacher Education A Symposium on University Music Education in China
Publication process dates
Deposited21 Sep 2016
AcceptedMay 2016
Accepted author manuscript
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https://repository.canterbury.ac.uk/item/87wyw/group-playing-by-ear-in-higher-education-the-processes-that-support-imitation-invention-and-group-improvisation

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