Kinome scale profiling of venom effects on cancer cells reveals potential new venom activities

Journal article


Mccullough, D., Atofanei, C., Knight, E., Trim, S. and Trim, C.M. 2020. Kinome scale profiling of venom effects on cancer cells reveals potential new venom activities. Toxicon. 185, pp. 129-146. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2020.07.007
AuthorsMccullough, D., Atofanei, C., Knight, E., Trim, S. and Trim, C.M.
Abstract

The search for novel and relevant cancer therapeutics is continuous and ongoing. Cancer adaptations, resulting in therapeutic treatment failures, fuel this continuous necessity for new drugs to novel targets. Recently, researchers have started to investigate the effect of venoms and venom components on different types of cancer, investigating their mechanisms of action. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) comprise a family of highly conserved and functionally important druggable targets for cancer therapy. This research exploits the novelty of complex venom mixtures to affect phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and related RTK family members, dually identifying new activities and unexplored avenues for future cancer and venom research. Six whole venoms from diverse species taxa, were evaluated for their ability to illicit changes in the phosphorylated expression of a panel of 49 commonly expressed RTKs. The triple negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-468 was treated with optimised venom doses, pre-determined by SDS PAGE and Western blot analysis. The phosphorylated expression levels of 49 RTKs in response to the venoms were assessed with the use of Human Phospho-RTK Arrays and analysed using ImageLab 5.2.1 analysis software (BioRad). Inhibition of EGFR phosphorylation occurred with treatment of venom from Acanthoscurria geniculata (Theraphosidae), Heterometrus swammerdami (Scorpionidae), Crotalus durissus vegrandis (Crotalidae) and Naja naja (Elapidae). Western green mamba Dendroaspis viridis venom increased EGFR phosphorylation. Eph, HGFR and HER were the most affected receptor families by venoms. Whilst the importance of these changes in terms of effect on MDA-MB-468 cells’ long-term viability and functionality are still unclear, the findings present exciting opportunities for further investigation as potential drug targets in cancer and as tools to understand better how these pathways interact.

KeywordsBreast cancer; Venom; Targeted therapy; Receptor Tyrosine Kinase; MDA-MB-468; Triple negative
Year2020
JournalToxicon
Journal citation185, pp. 129-146
PublisherElsevier
ISSN0041-0101
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2020.07.007
Official URLhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2020.07.007
FunderStaff Development Funding, CCCU
QR Funding
Publication dates
Online15 Oct 2020
Publication process dates
Accepted12 Jul 2020
Deposited13 Jul 2020
Accepted author manuscript
License
Output statusPublished
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https://repository.canterbury.ac.uk/item/8vxyw/kinome-scale-profiling-of-venom-effects-on-cancer-cells-reveals-potential-new-venom-activities

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