Singing for health: do members of a generic singing for health group express similar effects on health and wellbeing as those in condition-specific groups?

Journal article


Price, S. and Whitfield, L. 2018. Singing for health: do members of a generic singing for health group express similar effects on health and wellbeing as those in condition-specific groups? Journal of Applied Arts and Health. 9 (3), pp. 351-366. https://doi.org/10.1386/jaah.9.3.351_1
AuthorsPrice, S. and Whitfield, L.
Abstract

Throughout time, and within differing cultures, music has been understood to have a beneficial impact on health. Group singing, in particular, may have specific benefits for health when compared to alternative forms of music making and listening, and there exists a growing body of research examining the impact of singing on health.

This mixed methods study explored the benefits to health and wellbeing reported by people attending a generic singing for health group.

A comparison of findings was made against existing data regarding benefits reported by people attending condition-specific groups. Results indicated a similarity in reported benefits and a preference for a generic group, which may have implications for the future commissioning of singing for health groups.

KeywordsSinging for health; arts and health; commissioning; participant preference; wellbeing; self-funding
Year2018
JournalJournal of Applied Arts and Health
Journal citation9 (3), pp. 351-366
PublisherIntellect
ISSN2040-2457
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1386/jaah.9.3.351_1
Publication dates
Print01 Nov 2018
Publication process dates
Deposited07 Nov 2018
Accepted10 Oct 2018
Accepted author manuscript
Output statusPublished
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https://repository.canterbury.ac.uk/item/88x76/singing-for-health-do-members-of-a-generic-singing-for-health-group-express-similar-effects-on-health-and-wellbeing-as-those-in-condition-specific-groups

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