The addiction Stroop task: examining the fast and slow effects of smoking and marijuana-related cues

Journal article


Cane, J., Sharma, D. and Albery, I. 2008. The addiction Stroop task: examining the fast and slow effects of smoking and marijuana-related cues. Journal of Psychopharmacology. 23 (5), pp. 510-519. https://doi.org/10.1177/0269881108091253
AuthorsCane, J., Sharma, D. and Albery, I.
Abstract

Abstract, Research has shown that attentional bias toward smoking-related stimuli is related to the maintenance of smoking behaviour and the chance of a relapse during a quit attempt. Effects of smoking attentional bias can occur both during smoking stimulus presentation (fast effect) and on stimuli that immediately follow smoking stimuli (slow effect). The current research builds on these findings by closely examining the temporal aspects of these fast and slow effects across groups of different smoking status. In Experiment 1 (N = 64), smokers, smokers attempting to quit (SATQ) and non-smokers completed an addiction Stroop task using smoking related, negative emotion and neutral stimuli. In Experiment 2 (N = 32), marijuana smokers and non-marijuana smokers completed an addiction Stroop task using marijuana and neutral stimuli. Results showed fast effects across all smoking groups (except non-smokers) and slow effects in SATQ and marijuana smokers. Furthermore, marijuana smokers showed slow effects over extended periods of time. Results also show a relationship between anxiety, nicotine dependence and attentional bias in SATQ. The implications of these findings are discussed.

Year2008
JournalJournal of Psychopharmacology
Journal citation23 (5), pp. 510-519
PublisherSAGE
ISSN0269-8811
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1177/0269881108091253
Publication dates
Online18 Jun 2008
Publication process dates
Deposited02 Mar 2017
Output statusPublished
Permalink -

https://repository.canterbury.ac.uk/item/88102/the-addiction-stroop-task-examining-the-fast-and-slow-effects-of-smoking-and-marijuana-related-cues

  • 3
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 0
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

Effects of length of mindfulness practice on mindfulness, depression, anxiety and stress: a randomized controlled experiment
Strohmaier, S., Jones, F. and Cane, J. 2020. Effects of length of mindfulness practice on mindfulness, depression, anxiety and stress: a randomized controlled experiment. Mindfulness. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-020-01512-5
Taking another’s visual perspective: examining the role of biased thoughts, salient objects and distracting environments
Cane, J., Ferguson, H. and Ulrich, P. 2017. Taking another’s visual perspective: examining the role of biased thoughts, salient objects and distracting environments.
The impact of alcohol cognitions and contexts on perspective tasking
Cane, J., Ferguson, H., Ulrich, P. and Apperly, I. 2016. The impact of alcohol cognitions and contexts on perspective tasking.
Eye-tracking reveals the cost of switching between self and other perspectives in a visual perspective-taking task
Ferguson, H., Apperly, I. and Cane, J. 2016. Eye-tracking reveals the cost of switching between self and other perspectives in a visual perspective-taking task. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. 70 (8), pp. 1646-1660. https://doi.org/10.1080/17470218.2016.1199716
Validation of the theoretical domains framework for use in behaviour change and implementation research
Cane, J., O'Connor, D. and Michie, S. 2012. Validation of the theoretical domains framework for use in behaviour change and implementation research. Implementation Science : IS. 7 (1), p. 37. https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-5908-7-37
The time-course of recovery from interruption during reading: Eye movement evidence for the role of interruption lag and spatial memory
Cane, J., Cauchard, F. and Weger, U. 2012. The time-course of recovery from interruption during reading: Eye movement evidence for the role of interruption lag and spatial memory. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. 65 (7), pp. 1397-1413. https://doi.org/10.1080/17470218.2012.656666
Behaviour change among overweight and socially disadvantaged adults: a longitudinal study of the NHS Health Trainer Service
Gardner, B., Cane, J., Rumsey, N. and Michie, S. 2012. Behaviour change among overweight and socially disadvantaged adults: a longitudinal study of the NHS Health Trainer Service. Psychology and Health. 27 (10), pp. 1178-1193. https://doi.org/10.1080/08870446.2011.652112
The Behavior Change Technique Taxonomy (v1) of 93 hierarchically clustered techniques: building an international consensus for the reporting of behavior change interventions
Michie, S., Richardson, M., Johnston, M., Abraham, C., Francis, J., Hardeman, W., Eccles, M., Cane, J. and Wood, C. 2013. The Behavior Change Technique Taxonomy (v1) of 93 hierarchically clustered techniques: building an international consensus for the reporting of behavior change interventions. Annals of Behavioral Medicine. 46 (1), pp. 81-95. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12160-013-9486-6
From lists of behaviour change techniques (BCTs) to structured hierarchies: comparison of two methods of developing a hierarchy of BCTs
Cane, J., Richardson, M., Johnston, M., Ladha, R. and Michie, S. 2014. From lists of behaviour change techniques (BCTs) to structured hierarchies: comparison of two methods of developing a hierarchy of BCTs. British Journal of Health Psychology. 20 (1), pp. 130-150. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjhp.12102
Empathy predicts false belief reasoning ability: evidence from the N400
Ferguson, H., Cane, J., Douchkov, M. and Wright, D. 2014. Empathy predicts false belief reasoning ability: evidence from the N400. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. 10 (6), pp. 848-855. https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsu131
Examining the cognitive costs of counterfactual language comprehension: evidence from ERPs
Ferguson, H. and Cane, J. 2015. Examining the cognitive costs of counterfactual language comprehension: evidence from ERPs. Brain Research. 1622, pp. 252-269. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2015.05.024
Using perspective to resolve reference: the impact of cognitive load and motivation
Cane, J., Ferguson, H. and Apperly, I. 2017. Using perspective to resolve reference: the impact of cognitive load and motivation. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition. https://doi.org/10.1037/xlm0000345
Task constraints distinguish perspective inferences from perspective use during discourse interpretation in a false belief task
Ferguson, H., Apperly, I., Ahmad, J., Bindemann, M. and Cane, J. 2015. Task constraints distinguish perspective inferences from perspective use during discourse interpretation in a false belief task. Cognition. 139, pp. 50-70. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2015.02.010
Influence of background speech and music in interrupted reading: an eye-tracking study
Cauchard, F., Cane, J. and Weger, U. 2011. Influence of background speech and music in interrupted reading: an eye-tracking study. Applied Cognitive Psychology. 26 (3), pp. 381-390. https://doi.org/10.1002/acp.1837
Tracking the impact of depression in a perspective-taking task
Ferguson, H. and Cane, J. 2017. Tracking the impact of depression in a perspective-taking task. Scientific Reports. 7. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-13922-y